Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 215–228 | Cite as

The relationship between dietary fat intake and risk of colorectal cancer: evidence from the combined analysis of 13 case-control studies

  • Geoffrey R. Howe
  • Kristan J. Aronson
  • Enrique Benito
  • Roberto Castelleto
  • Jacqueline Cornée
  • Stephen Duffy
  • Richard P. Gallagher
  • José M. Iscovich
  • Jiao Deng-ao
  • Rudolf Kaaks
  • Gabriel A. Kune
  • Susan Kune
  • Hin P. Lee
  • Marion Lee
  • Anthony B. Miller
  • Ruth K. Peters
  • John D. Potter
  • Elio Riboli
  • Martha L. Slattery
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
  • Albert Tuyns
  • Anastasia Tzonou
  • Lyndsey F. Watson
  • Alice S. Whittemore
  • Anna H. Wu-Williams
  • Zheng Shu
Article

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the intakeof dietary fat upon colorectal cancer risk in a combined analysis of datafrom 13 case-control studies previously conducted in populations withdiffering colorectal cancer rates and dietary practices. Original datarecords for 5,287 cases of colorectal cancer and 10,470 controls werecombined. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR)for intakes of total energy, total fat and its components, and cholesterol.Positive associations with energy intake were observed for 11 of the 13studies. However, there was little, if any, evidence of anyenergy-independent effect of either total fat with ORs of 1.00, 0.95, 1.01,1.02, and 0.92 for quintiles of residuals of total fat intake (P trend =0.67) or for saturated fat with ORs of 1.00, 1.08, 1.06, 1.21, and 1.06 (Ptrend = 0.39). The analysis suggests that, among these case-control studies,there is no energy-independent association between dietary fat intake andrisk of colorectal cancer. It also suggests that simple substitution of fatby other sources of calories is unlikely to reduce meaningfully the risk ofcolorectal cancer.

Case-control studies colorectal neoplasms dietary fat energy 

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey R. Howe
    • 1
  • Kristan J. Aronson
    • 2
  • Enrique Benito
    • 3
  • Roberto Castelleto
    • 4
  • Jacqueline Cornée
    • 5
  • Stephen Duffy
    • 6
  • Richard P. Gallagher
    • 7
  • José M. Iscovich
    • 8
  • Jiao Deng-ao
    • 9
  • Rudolf Kaaks
    • 10
  • Gabriel A. Kune
    • 11
  • Susan Kune
    • 11
  • Hin P. Lee
    • 12
  • Marion Lee
    • 13
  • Anthony B. Miller
    • 14
  • Ruth K. Peters
    • 15
  • John D. Potter
    • 16
  • Elio Riboli
    • 10
  • Martha L. Slattery
    • 17
  • Dimitrios Trichopoulos
    • 18
  • Albert Tuyns
    • 10
  • Anastasia Tzonou
    • 19
  • Lyndsey F. Watson
    • 11
  • Alice S. Whittemore
    • 20
  • Anna H. Wu-Williams
    • 15
  • Zheng Shu
    • 9
  1. 1.Division of EpidemiologyColumbia University School of Public HealthNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Community Health and EpidemiologyQueens UniversityKingstonCanada
  3. 3.Unitat d'Epidemiologia i Registre de Cancer de MallorcaPalma de MallorcaSpain
  4. 4.Department of PathologyLa Plata National UniversityLa PlataArgentina
  5. 5.INSERMLyonFrance
  6. 6.Biostatistics UnitMedical Research CouncilCambridgeUK
  7. 7.Cancer Control Agency of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  8. 8.Ministry of Health JerusalemIsrael Center for Registration of Cancer and Allied DiseasesIsrael
  9. 9.Chejiang Medical University HangchoPeople's Republic of China
  10. 10.International Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance
  11. 11.Department of SurgeryUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  12. 12.Department of Community, Occupational and Family MedicineNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  13. 13.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  14. 14.Department of Preventive Medicine and BiostatisticsUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  15. 15.Department of Preventive MedicineUniversity of Southern California, School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  16. 16.Division of Public Health SciencesFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  17. 17.Department of Oncological SciencesUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  18. 18.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  19. 19.Department of Hygiene and EpidemiologyUniversity of AthensAthensGreece
  20. 20.Department of Health Research and Policy, Division of EpidemiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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