Chromosome Research

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 23–30

High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization of human Y-linked genes on released chromatin

  • Birgitta Gla¨ser
  • Thomas Hierl
  • Kay Taylor
  • Katrin Schiebel
  • Sylvia Zeitler
  • Katia Papadopoullos
  • Gudrun Rappold
  • Werner Schempp
Article

Abstract

Genes within the differential region of the human Y chromosome do not recombine, and therefore the determination of their location depends on physical mapping. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning the euchromatic region of the human Y have become a powerful tool for the generation of an overlapping clone map. With this approach,however, complete physical mapping is difficult in Y euchromatic regions that are rich in repetitive sequences. We have, therefore, made use of the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique as an alternative strategy for physically mapping the PRKY and AMELY genes as well as the TSPY, RBM and DAZ gene families to human Y chromosomes in prometaphase and to extended Y chromatin in interphase. From our results, the following order of gene sequences in interval 3 of the short arm of the human Y chromosome is suggested: TSPY major with few RBM sequences interspersed-PRKY-AMELY-TSPY minor with few RBM sequences interspersed-cen. On the long arm, RBM sequences appear to be distributed over wide regions of intervals 5 and 6 with few TSPY sequences interspersed. Distal to an RBM signal cluster, a large cluster of DAZ signals is located with only a few DAZ and RBM signals overlapping in between the two clusters.

high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization human Y-linked genes 

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Birgitta Gla¨ser
    • 1
  • Thomas Hierl
    • 1
  • Kay Taylor
    • 2
  • Katrin Schiebel
    • 3
  • Sylvia Zeitler
    • 1
  • Katia Papadopoullos
    • 2
  • Gudrun Rappold
    • 3
  • Werner Schempp
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Human Genetics and AnthropologyUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.The Galton LaboratoryUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Institute of Human Genetics and AnthropologyUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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