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Euphytica

, Volume 103, Issue 2, pp 211–217 | Cite as

Characteristics and inheritance of natural facultative-parthenocarpic fruit-set in ‘Nadja’ tomato under low temperature conditions

  • Mohamed F. Mohamed
Article

Abstract

‘Nadja’ tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) set both seedless and seeded fruits under the fluctuating temperatures prevailing during late-March and early-April in Assiut district, Egypt. Entirely seedless fruits developed under the low temperatures prevailing during Dec. Seedless fruits seemed to develop vegetatively , i.e. with no need for stimulus pollination. All seedless fruits were normally jelled and appeared similar in shape and size to the seeded fruits. Study of F1, F2, and backcross generations for the crosses ‘Cal Ace’ × ‘Nadja’ and ‘Peto-86’ × ‘Nadja’ suggested that the expression of the trait was due to single homozygous recessive gene. Yield produced by ‘Nadja’ was higher than the F1, F2, and backcross generations in both the early- summer and the late-winter plantings. Potentially useful parthenocarpic segregates were found in F2 of the two crosses for increased fruit weight of normally shaped and jelled fruits.

breeding resources environmental stresses genetics inheritance Lycopersicon esculentum seedlessness 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohamed F. Mohamed
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureAssiut UniversityAssiutEgypt

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