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Euphytica

, Volume 103, Issue 2, pp 235–242 | Cite as

Genetic diversity in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) germplasm from Pakistan as determined by RAPDs

  • Malik Ashiq Rabbani
  • Aki Iwabuchi
  • Yoshie Murakami
  • Tohru Suzuki
  • Kenji Takayanagi
Article

Abstract

The genetic diversity and the relationships among a collection of mustard (B. juncea) germplasm, including 41 accessions collected from Pakistan, 6 oilseed cultivars/ lines and 5 Japanese vegetable cultivars, were evaluated using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. A total of 198 polymorphic amplified products were obtained from 30 decamer primers. Of these, 14 were unique to the accession PAK-85835 and 37 were specific to PAK-85839. Based on pair-wise comparisons of RAPD amplification products, genetic similarity was estimated using similarity coefficients of Nei & Li (1979) and a dendrogram was constructed using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA). Cluster analysis based on these genetic similarities placed most of the collected germplasm and oilseed cultivars/lines close to each other, showing a low level of polymorphism between the oilseed accessions collected in Pakistan. However, the clusters formed by the oilseed collections and cultivars were distinct from those formed by the vegetable cultivars. A low level of genetic variability of oilseed mustard in Pakistan was attributed to the selection for similar traits and horticultural uses. The farmers' preference for more remunerative crops and perhaps the close parentage of these accessions further contributed towards their little diversity. The study demonstrated that the RAPD is a simple and fast technique to compare the genetic relationships and the patterns of variation among accessions of this crop.

Brassica juncea diversity germplasm Pakistan relationships RAPDs 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malik Ashiq Rabbani
    • 1
  • Aki Iwabuchi
    • 1
  • Yoshie Murakami
    • 1
  • Tohru Suzuki
    • 1
  • Kenji Takayanagi
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Agriculture & ForestryUniversity of Tsukuba, TsukubaIbaraki-Japan

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