Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 131, Issue 4, pp 309–311 | Cite as

Role of Sex Hormones in Development of Pituitary Adenoma

  • V. N. Babichev
  • E. I. Marova
  • T. A. Kuznetsova
  • E. I. Adamskaya
  • I. V. Shishkina
  • S. Yu. Kasumova
Article

Abstract

Role of sex hormones in the development of pituitary adenomas was investigated by analyzing the content of nuclear estradiol and testosterone receptors in different tumors of the anterior pituitary: prolactinomas, meningiomas, growth hormone-producing adenomas, astrocytomas, neurinomas, and ependymomas. The concentration of nuclear estrogen and androgen receptors in prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas was much higher than in growth hormone-producing adenomas and other pituitary tumors.

sex hormones pituitary adenoma feedback regulation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. N. Babichev
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. I. Marova
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. A. Kuznetsova
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. I. Adamskaya
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. V. Shishkina
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Yu. Kasumova
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Physiology of Endocrine System, Department of NeuroendocrinologyEndocrinology Research CenterRussia
  2. 2.N. N. Burdenko Institute of NeurosurgeryRussian Academy of Medical SciencesMoscow

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