Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 131, Issue 4, pp 367–370 | Cite as

Individual Sensitivity to Genotoxic Effects of Nickel and Antimutagenic Activity of Ascorbic Acid

  • I. N. Perminova
  • T. A. Sinel'shchikova
  • N. I. Alekhina
  • E. V. Perminova
  • G. D. Zasukhina
Article

Abstract

Cytotoxicity of nickel compounds was studied by stimulating the repair synthesis of DNA and counting lymphocyte micronuclei in workers of smelting shop of copper-nickel sulfide processing plant. Nickel content in the organism was evaluated by its concentrations in hair. Therapy with ascorbic acid (1 g/day for 1 month) led to a significant decrease in the number of micronuclei. The number of micronuclei before and after ascorbic acid treatment varied within a wide range in different individuals.

nickel professional exposure micronuclei repair DNA synthesis ascorbic acid individual sensitivity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. N. Perminova
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. A. Sinel'shchikova
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. I. Alekhina
  • E. V. Perminova
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. D. Zasukhina
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Group of Medical Ecological Studies, Institute of Industrial Ecology Problems of the North, Karelian Research CenterRussian Academy of SciencesApatity
  2. 2.Laboratory of Mutagenesis and Repair, N. I. Vavilov Institute of General GeneticsRussian Academy of SciencesMoscow

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