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Higher Education

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 1–34 | Cite as

The World Bank and financing higher education in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Kingsley Banya
  • Juliet Elu
Article

Abstract

This article critically examines World Bank andother donor agency's policy changes towardfinancing of higher education in Sub-SaharanAfrica. It concludes that policy vicissitudeshave adversely affected these institutions. Therecommendation is that the unique context ofeach state play a role in higher educationfinancial policy formation and implementation.

developing financing higher education recent trends sub-Saharan Africa World Bank 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kingsley Banya
    • 1
  • Juliet Elu
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational Leadership & Policy StudiesFlorida International University, College of EducationMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of EconomicsSpelman CollegeAtlantaUSA

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