Euphytica

, Volume 120, Issue 3, pp 401–408

Anther culture in connection with induced mutations for rice improvement

  • Q.F. Chen
  • C.L. Wang
  • Y.M. Lu
  • M. Shen
  • R. Afza
  • M.V. Duren
  • H. Brunner
Article

Abstract

Doubled haploids have long been recognized as a valuable tool in plant breeding since it not only offers the quickest method of advancing heterozygous breeding lines to homozygosity, but also increases the selection efficiency over conventional procedures due to better discrimination between genotypes within any one generation. Ten cultivars of japonica rice and nine cultivars of indica rice were evaluated for androgenic response. Various doses (10–50 Gy) of gamma rays were applied to investigate the effect of radiation on callus formation, green plant regeneration and the frequency of selected doubled haploid mutants. Similarly, the effects of colchicine concentration (10–200 mg/l) on callus induction, regeneration and fertility of green plants were observed. It was demonstrated that the dose of 20 Gy gamma rays and 30 mg/l concentration of colchicine have significant stimulation effect on regeneration of green plants from rice anther culture. The high frequency of observed doubled haploid mutants indicates that anther culture applied in connection with gamma rays is an effective way to improve rice cultivars.

colchicine doubled haploids gamma rays mutagenesis mutants Oryza sativa 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Q.F. Chen
    • 1
  • C.L. Wang
    • 1
  • Y.M. Lu
    • 1
  • M. Shen
    • 1
  • R. Afza
    • 2
  • M.V. Duren
    • 2
  • H. Brunner
    • 2
  1. 1.Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural SciencesHangzhouP.R. China
  2. 2.Plant Breeding UnitFAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology LaboratorySeibersdorfAustria

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