Astrophysics and Space Science

, Volume 269, Issue 0, pp 721–738

The Ultimate Question of Origins: God and the Beginning of the Universe

  • William Lane Craig
Article

Abstract

Both cosmology and philosophy trace their roots to the wonder felt by the ancient Greeks as they contemplated the universe. The ultimate question remains why the universe exists rather than nothing. This question led Leibniz to postulate the existence of a metaphysically necessary being, which he identified as God. Leibniz's critics, however, disputed this identification, claiming that the space-time universe itself may be the metaphysically necessary being. The discovery during this century that the universe began to exist, however, calls into question the universe's status as metaphysically necessary, since any necessary being must be eternal in its existence. Although various cosmogonic models claiming to avert the beginning of the universe predicted by the standard model have been and continue to be offered, no model involving an eternal universe has proved as plausible as the standard model. Unless we are to assert that the universe simply sprang into being uncaused out of nothing, we are thus led to Leibniz's conclusion. Several objections to inferring a supernatural cause of the origin of the universe are considered and found to be unsound.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Lane Craig
    • 1
  1. 1.Talbot School of TheologyBiola UniversityLa MiradaUSA

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