Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

, Volume 19, Issue 9, pp 411–416 | Cite as

The 50 Million Missing Women

  • Gautam N. Allahbadia
Article

Abstract

The epidemic of gender selection is ravaging countries like India & China. Approximately fifty million women are “missing” in the Indian population. Generally three principle causes are given: female infanticide, better food and health care for boys and maternal death at childbirth. Prenatal sex determination and the abortion of female fetuses threatens to skew the sex ratio to new highs. Estimates of the number of female fetuses being destroyed every year in India vary from two million to five million. This review from India attempts to summarize all the currently available methods of sex selection and also highlights the current medical practice regards the subject in south-east Asia.

Sex selection fetal sex determination 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gautam N. Allahbadia
    • 1
  1. 1.Rotunda – The Center For Human ReproductionMumbaiIndia

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