Natural Computing

, Volume 1, Issue 2–3, pp 165–183 | Cite as

How ciliates manipulate their own DNA – A splendid example of natural computing

  • David M. Prescott
  • Grzegorz Rozenberg
Article

Abstract

DNA computing is a novel and vivid researcharea which is genuinely interdisciplinary –computer scientists and molecular scientistscollaborate to investigate the use of DNAmolecules for the purpose of computing. DNAcomputing in vivo is the investigation ofcomputations taking place naturally in a livingcell, with the goal of understandingcomputational properties of DNA molecules intheir native environment. Gene assembly inciliates (single cell organisms) is perhaps themost involved process of DNA manipulation yetknown in living organisms. The computationalnature of this process has attracted muchattention in recent years. The resultsobtained so far demonstrate that this processof gene assembly is a splendid example ofcomputing taking place in nature, i.e., NaturalComputing. Indeed, DNA computing in vivomay be far more widespread in nature than wecurrently recognize. This paper is a tutorialon (computational nature of the) gene assemblyin ciliates, which is intended for a broadaudience of researchers interested in NaturalComputing. In particular, no knowledge ofmolecular biology is assumed on the part of themotivated reader.

blunder ciliates DNA computing in vivo 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Prescott
    • 1
  • Grzegorz Rozenberg
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental BiologyUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA;
  3. 3.Leiden Institute of Advanced Computer ScienceLeiden UniversityLeidenThe Netherlands

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