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Pharmaceutical Research

, Volume 19, Issue 7, pp 921–925 | Cite as

Biopharmaceutics Classification System: The Scientific Basis for Biowaiver Extensions

  • Lawrence X. Yu
  • Gordon L. Amidon
  • James E. Polli
  • Hong Zhao
  • Mehul U. Mehta
  • Dale P. Conner
  • Vinod P. Shah
  • Lawrence J. Lesko
  • Mei-Ling Chen
  • Vincent H. L. Lee
  • Ajaz S. Hussain
Commentary
Biopharmaceutics Classification System solubility permeability dissolution bioequivalence immediate-release products 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence X. Yu
    • 1
  • Gordon L. Amidon
    • 2
  • James E. Polli
    • 3
  • Hong Zhao
    • 1
  • Mehul U. Mehta
    • 1
  • Dale P. Conner
    • 1
  • Vinod P. Shah
    • 1
  • Lawrence J. Lesko
    • 1
  • Mei-Ling Chen
    • 1
  • Vincent H. L. Lee
    • 4
  • Ajaz S. Hussain
    • 1
  1. 1.Food and Drug AdministrationCenter for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Pharmaceutical ScienceRockville
  2. 2.Department of PharmaceuticsUniversity of Michigan, College of PharmacyAnn Arbor
  3. 3.Department of Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of Maryland, School of PharmacyBaltimore
  4. 4.Department of Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of Southern California, School of PharmacyLos Angeles

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