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Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 519–530 | Cite as

The Schema Questionnaire—Short Form: Factor Analysis and Relationship Between Schemas and Symptoms

  • Ken Welburn
  • Marjorie Coristine
  • Paul Dagg
  • Amanda Pontefract
  • Shelley Jordan
Article

Abstract

The original version of the Schema Questionnaire was developed by Young to measure early maladaptive schemas. These maladaptive schemas are thought to be important in the development and maintenance of psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety and depression. Factor analytic research with this 205-item version of the Schema Questionnaire has supported the schemas proposed by Young. The Schema Questionnaire—Short Form (SQ-SF) was designed (J. E. Young, 1998) to measure 15 maladaptive schemas and is a briefer (75 item) instrument. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the SQ-SF with a sample of patients in a psychiatric day treatment program. The factor analysis supported the 15 schema subscales proposed by Young. These 15 subscales demonstrated good internal consistency. The present study also examined the relationship between the SQ-SF subscales and psychiatric symptomatology. Results provided support for the construct validity of the SQ-SF, suggesting the importance of maladaptive schemas in the development and maintenance of psychiatric symptoms.

Brief Symptom Inventory Schema Questionnaire schema factor analysis questionnaire validation psychiatric symptoms 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken Welburn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marjorie Coristine
    • 3
  • Paul Dagg
    • 3
    • 2
  • Amanda Pontefract
    • 2
  • Shelley Jordan
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Ottawa Anxiety and Trauma ClinicOttawaCanada
  2. 2.University of OttawaOttawaCanada
  3. 3.Royal Ottawa HospitalOttawaCanada

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