Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 195–205 | Cite as

Age-Related Decrease in the Inducibility of Heat-Shock Protein 70 in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

  • R. Njemini
  • M. Vanden Abeele
  • C. Demanet
  • M. Lambert
  • S. Vandebosch
  • T. Mets
Article

Abstract

We have investigated the effect of age and of the presence of proinflammatory cytokines on Hsp 70 production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, using flow cytometry. Twenty-seven women and 23 men, all apparently healthy, participated in the study. At 37°C, the percentage of Hsp 70-producing monocytes and lymphocytes, as well as the level of Hsp 70 in monocytes, were negatively influenced by age. After exposure of the cells to 42°C, the increase of Hsp 70 production was more pronounced in monocytes than in lymphocytes; both the intensity of Hsp 70 production and the percentage of Hsp 70-producing cells were negatively influenced by the age of the subjects, as well for monocytes as for lymphocytes. There was a negative correlation between the intensity of Hsp 70 production by monocytes exposed to 42°C and the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. In conclusion, in human monocytes and lymphocytes, heat-induced Hsp 70 production is reduced with increasing age and is negatively influenced in monocytes by proinflammatory cytokines.

Peripheral mononuclear blood cells heat shock heat-shock protein 70 aging proinflammatory cytokines 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Njemini
    • 1
  • M. Vanden Abeele
    • 1
  • C. Demanet
    • 2
  • M. Lambert
    • 1
  • S. Vandebosch
    • 1
  • T. Mets
    • 1
  1. 1.Geriatric Unit, Academic HospitalFree University Brussels (VUB)Belgium
  2. 2.HLA and Immunology Laboratory, Academic HospitalFree University Brussels (VUB)Belgium

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