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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry

, Volume 243, Issue 2, pp 387–388 | Cite as

Scintillating-Glass-Fiber Neutron Sensors, their Application and Performance for Plutonium Detection and Monitoring

  • R. S. Seymour
  • B. Richardson
  • M. Morichi
  • M. Bliss
  • R. A. Craig
  • D. S. Sunberg
Article

Abstract

Most neutron detection sensors presently employ 3He gas-filled detectors. Despite their excellent performance and widespread use, there are significant limitations to this technology. A significant alternative neutron sensor utilizing neutron-active material incorporated into a glass scintillator is presented that offers novel commercial sensors not possible or practical with gas tube technology. The scintillating optical fiber permits sensors with a multitude of sizes ranging from devices of a single fiber of 150µm to sensors with tens of thousands of fibers with areas as large as 5 m2 depending on the neutron flux to be measured. A second significant advantage is the use of high-speed electronics that allow a greater dynamic range, not possible with gas detectors. These sensors are flexible, conformable and less sensitive to vibration that optimizes the source-to-detector geometry and provides robust performance in field applications. The glass-fibers are sensitive to both gamma-rays and neutrons. However, the coincidence electronics are optimized for neutron to gamma-ray discrimination allowing very sensitive measurements with a low false-alarm rate. Applications include SNM surveillance, material control and accountability (MC&A), safeguard inspections, Pu health physics/bioassay and environmental characterization.

Keywords

Plutonium Neutron Flux Material Control Neutron Detection Detection Sensor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Seymour
    • 1
  • B. Richardson
    • 1
  • M. Morichi
    • 1
  • M. Bliss
    • 1
  • R. A. Craig
    • 2
  • D. S. Sunberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Nuclear Measurements GroupOxford Instruments Inc.Oak DriveUSA
  2. 2.Pacific Northwest National LaboratoryRichlandUSA

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