Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 351–356 | Cite as

The Need for Trauma Assessment and Related Clinical Services in a State-Funded Mental Health System

  • B. Christopher Frueh
  • Victoria C. Cousins
  • Thomas G. Hiers
  • S. Diane Cavenaugh
  • Karen J. Cusack
  • Alberto B. Santos
Article

Abstract

Previous data show that trauma is highly prevalent in public sector consumers and is associated with severe mental illness and high service use costs. Despite this, evidence suggests that trauma victims tend to go unrecognized and to receive inadequate mental health services. We surveyed all facilities (6 inpatient, 17 outpatient) within the South Carolina Department of Mental Health about their current services for trauma victims. Results indicate that most public mental health facilities do not routinely evaluate trauma history in an adequate manner or provide specialized trauma-related services. Implications and future directions are addressed, including the current trauma initiatives of many state-funded systems.

trauma posttraumatic stress disorder public mental health 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Christopher Frueh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Victoria C. Cousins
    • 3
  • Thomas G. Hiers
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. Diane Cavenaugh
    • 3
  • Karen J. Cusack
    • 3
  • Alberto B. Santos
    • 2
  1. 1.Mental Health Service (116), Veterans Affairs Medical CenterCharleston
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaUSA
  3. 3.South Carolina Department of Mental HealthUSA

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