Pharmaceutical Research

, Volume 8, Issue 8, pp 1071–1075

In Vivo Percutaneous Penetration/Absorption, Washington, D.C., May 1989

  • Vinod P. Shah
  • Gordon L. Flynn
  • Richard H. Guy
  • Howard I. Maibach
  • Hans Schaefer
  • Jerome P. Skelly
  • Ronald C. Wester
  • Avraham Yacobi
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vinod P. Shah
    • 1
  • Gordon L. Flynn
    • 2
  • Richard H. Guy
    • 3
  • Howard I. Maibach
    • 4
  • Hans Schaefer
    • 5
  • Jerome P. Skelly
    • 1
  • Ronald C. Wester
    • 3
  • Avraham Yacobi
    • 6
  1. 1.Center for Drug Evaluation and ResearchFood and Drug AdministrationRockville
  2. 2.College of PharmacyUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor
  3. 3.School of PharmacyUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco
  4. 4.Department of DermatologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco
  5. 5.Centre International de Recherches DermatologiquesValbonne CedexFrance
  6. 6.American Cyanamid CompanyNew York

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