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GeoJournal

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 59–70 | Cite as

Scaling ethnic segregation: causal processes and contingent outcomes in Chinese residential patterns

  • David H. Kaplan
  • Steven R. Holloway
Article

Abstract

This paper advances a contingent perspective of residential segregation that recognizes it as a universal phenomenon of residential differentiation, yet one that results from different causal processes and which results in different spatial outcomes. The analytical separation of groups, contexts and scale is key to understanding the nature of segregation, i.e., what it signifies to the group and to the host society. We argue that segregation is created and maintained by different choices and constraints occurring across dimensions of production, reproduction and consumption. Spatial outcomes vary considerably, and may be arrayed in regard to the permanence of segregation, whether it facilitates identity maintenance, and whether segregation itself empowers or marginalizes the ethnic population. To demonstrate our approach, we analyze the segregation experiences of Chinese ethnics. Our argument is organized around the global, national and local scales at which causal processes shape the Chinese experience of segregation.

context contingency ethnicity race scale segregation urban 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • David H. Kaplan
    • 1
  • Steven R. Holloway
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Department of GeographyKent State UniversityKentUSA

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