Modeling Moving Objects over Multiple Granularities

  • Kathleen Hornsby
  • Max J. Egenhofer

Abstract

This paper introduces a framework for modeling the movement of objects or individuals over multiple granularities. Granularity refers to selecting the appropriate level of detail for a task. At fine granularities, spatio-temporal information is revealed that was not previously known, such as additional locations that an individual visited or multiple visits to the same location. Conversely, moving to a coarser granularity or simpler view generalizes spatial and temporal aspects of movement allowing for an improved understanding of movement. Movement is modeled as geospatial lifelines, time-stamped records of the locations that an individual has occupied over a period of time. Depending on the desired granularity, lifelines are modeled as lifeline beads, necklaces, or more general approximations of these structures and this paper examines how different aspects of lifelines become relevant at refined or coarse granularities.

moving objects multiple granularities spatio-temporal knowledge representation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Hornsby
    • 1
  • Max J. Egenhofer
    • 2
  1. 1.USA
  2. 2.National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, Department of Spatial Information Science and Engineering, and Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of MaineOronoUSA

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