Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 13, Issue 5, pp 401–405

Breast-feeding and neuroblastoma, USA and Canada

  • Julie L. Daniels
  • Andrew F. Olshan
  • Brad H. Pollock
  • Narayan R. Shah
  • Daniel O. Stram
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1015746701922

Cite this article as:
Daniels, J.L., Olshan, A.F., Pollock, B.H. et al. Cancer Causes Control (2002) 13: 401. doi:10.1023/A:1015746701922

Abstract

Objective: Researchers have suggested an inverse association between breast-feeding and risk of childhood cancer. We investigated the association between breast-feeding and neuroblastoma in a large case–control study in the United States and Canada. Methods: Maternal reports of breast-feeding were compared among 393 children six months or older who had neuroblastoma and were identified through the Children's Cancer Group and the Pediatric Oncology Group and 376 age-matched controls identified by random-digit telephone dialing in a telephone interview case–control study. Results: Children with neuroblastoma were less likely to have breast-fed than control children (odds ratio (OR) = 0.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.5–0.9). The association between breast-feeding and neuroblastoma increased with breast-feeding duration (0–3 months OR = 0.7, CI = 0.4–1.0; 13+ months OR = 0.5, CI = 0.3–0.9). Conclusion: Breast-feeding was inversely associated with neuroblastoma and should be encouraged among healthy mothers. Additional research on possible mechanisms of this association may be warranted.

breast-feeding childhood neoplasms neuroblastoma 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie L. Daniels
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andrew F. Olshan
    • 3
  • Brad H. Pollock
    • 4
  • Narayan R. Shah
    • 5
  • Daniel O. Stram
    • 6
  1. 1.Epidemiology BranchNational Institute of Environmental Health SciencesResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Children's Oncology GroupUniversity of Texas Health Science CenterSan AntonioUSA
  5. 5.Department of Pediatric Hematology-OncologyGeisinger Medical CenterDanvilleUSA
  6. 6.Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations