Qualitative Sociology

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 273–297 | Cite as

Hierarchy and Partnership in New Orleans

Article

Abstract

Recently, increasing numbers of partnerships have emerged in which universities work to address economic, social, and political problems within troubled communities. Such experiences have led to careful discussion of the model such efforts should follow, and a literature which has assessed such activity as overwhelmingly positive. Based on team ethnographic research, this case study discusses the emergence of one such partnership that was forged at high levels of government and university administration. Such an emergence, we argue, impacted the partnership in such a way that the interests of more powerful members outweighed those of members with less power. Unequal interests influenced the structure of the partnership, its ability to carry out its mission, the participation of community residents, and intentions for the future of the partnership.

organizations university-community partnerships public housing community organizing 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of Tennessee-KnoxvilleKnoxville

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