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Fire Technology

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 7–34 | Cite as

Socioeconomic Characteristics and Their Relationship to Fire Incidence: A Review of the Literature

  • Charles R. Jennings
Article

Abstract

This article presents a literature review of the socioeconomic modeling of fire incidence, with an emphasis on urban residential fires. The development and history of socioeconomic models of fire incidence are reviewed from the perspectives of ecology and location economics within the urban planning discipline, which encompasses sociological, economic, epidemiological, and interdisciplinary approaches. The predominant methodology used is a thematic type of qualitative analysis, and detailed information on variables selected and results are offered where appropriate. The article closes with suggestions for further research.

socioeconomic factors fire prevention urban fires fire risk models 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles R. Jennings
    • 1
  1. 1.PeekskillU.S.A.

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