Journal of Science Teacher Education

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 63–83

Summer Scientific Research for Teachers: The Experience and its Effect

  • Julie F. Westerlund
  • Dana M. García
  • Joseph R. Koke
  • Teresa A. Taylor
  • Diana S. Mason
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie F. Westerlund
    • 1
  • Dana M. García
    • 1
  • Joseph R. Koke
    • 1
  • Teresa A. Taylor
    • 2
  • Diana S. Mason
    • 3
  1. 1.Southwest Texas State UniversitySan MarcosU.S.A
  2. 2.Smithson Valley High SchoolSpring BranchU.S.A
  3. 3.University of North TexasDentonU.S.A

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