Journal of Science Teacher Education

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 27–42 | Cite as

Dancing with Maggots and Saints: Visions for Subject Matter Knowledge, Pedagogical Knowledge, and Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Science Teacher Education Reform

  • Dana L. Zeidler
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dana L. Zeidler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Secondary Education, College of EducationUniversity of South FloridaTampaU.S.A

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