Crime, Law and Social Change

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 203–223 | Cite as

Crime as enterprise? – The case of ``transnational organised crime''

  • Adam Edwards
  • Pete Gill
Article

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baldwin, R. et al. (eds.), A Reader on Regulation (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998).Google Scholar
  2. Beare, M.E. and R.T. Naylor, Major Issues Relating to Organized Crime: within the context of economic relationships, Prepared for Law Commission of Canada, 1999 www.lcc.gc.ca/en/papersGoogle Scholar
  3. Bigo, D., “The European Internal Security Field: stakes in a newly developing area of police intervention”, in M. Anderson and M. den Boer (eds.), Policing Across National Boundaries (London: Pinter, 1994).Google Scholar
  4. Block, A., “Organized Crime, Garbage, and Toxic waste: an overview,” in A. Block (ed.), Perspectives on Organized Crime: Essays in Opposition (Kluwer, 1991) pp. 79–104.Google Scholar
  5. Block, A. and W. Chambliss, Organizing Crime (New York: Elsevier, 1981).Google Scholar
  6. Bourdieu, P., The Logic of Practice (Cambridge, Polity Press, 1990).Google Scholar
  7. Castells, M., The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture, Vol. II, The Power of Identity (Blackwell, Oxford, 1997).Google Scholar
  8. Clarke, R.V., “Situational Crime Prevention: theory and practice”, British Journal of Criminology 1980 (20), 136–147.Google Scholar
  9. Clarke, R.V., Situational Crime Prevention: Successful Case Studies 2nd ed. (New York: Harrow and Heston, 1997).Google Scholar
  10. Clay, P., “Taking Transnational Organised Crime Seriously”, International Journal of Risk, Security and Crime Prevention 1998 (3:2), 93–98.Google Scholar
  11. Cressey, D.R., Theft of the Nation: The Structure and Operations of Organised Crime in America (New York: Harper and Row, 1969).Google Scholar
  12. Dintino, J. and F.T. Martens, Police Intelligence Systems in Crime Control: maintaining a delicate balance in a liberal democracy (C. Thomas Publishing, Springfield Illinois, 1983).Google Scholar
  13. Dorn, N. et al., Traffickers: Drug Markets and Law Enforcement (Routledge, London, 1992).Google Scholar
  14. Edwards, A., “The (Dis)Connections of Organised crime”, Security Journal 1999 (12:1), 79–81.Google Scholar
  15. Edwards, A. and P. Gill, “Coming to Terms with Transnational Organised Crime”, paper presented to the inaugural meeting of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Leicester, 8th September 1999).Google Scholar
  16. Ekblom, P., Organised crime and the Conjunction of Criminal Opportunity, Draft Note (London: Home Office Research and Statistics Department, 1999a).Google Scholar
  17. Ekblom, P., “Can We Make Crime Prevention Adaptive by Learning from Other Evolutionary Struggles?” Studies on Crime and Crime Prevention 1999b (8:1), 27–51.Google Scholar
  18. Elvins, M., “Evolution of EU Policy on Transnational Organised Crime: a contemporary overview”, Paper presented to the second meeting of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Leicester, 15th December 1999).Google Scholar
  19. Felson, M., Crime and Everyday Life 2nd ed. (Thousand Oaks, Ca: Pine Forge, 1998).Google Scholar
  20. Fiorentini, G and S. Peltzman, “Introduction,” in Fiorentini and Peltzman (eds.), The Economics of Organized Crime (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).Google Scholar
  21. Foucault, M., Discipline and Punish (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1977).Google Scholar
  22. Garland, D., “Limits of the Sovereign State: Contemporary Crime Control Strategies”, British Journal of Criminology 1996.Google Scholar
  23. Gill, P., Rounding Up the Usual Suspects? Developments in contemporary law enforcement (Ashgate: Aldershot, 2000).Google Scholar
  24. Gilligan, J., “The Role of Interpol in the Fight Against Organised Crime”, Paper presented to the inaugural meeting of the Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Leicester, 8th September 1999).Google Scholar
  25. Goodey, J., “Organised Crime, Its Victims and the European Union”, Paper presented to the fifth meeting of the Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (Home Office, 15th December 2000).Google Scholar
  26. Gregory, F., “Debate: There is a Global Crime Problem”, International Journal of Risk, Security and Crime Prevention 1998 (3:2), 133–137.Google Scholar
  27. Hobbs, D., “Debate: There is not a Global Crime Problem”, International Journal of Risk, Security and Crime Prevention 1998a (3:2), 139–146.Google Scholar
  28. Hobbs, D., “Going Down the Glocal: The Local Context of Organised Crime”, The Howard Journal 1998b (37:4), 407–422.Google Scholar
  29. Hobbs, D., “The Firm: Organisational Logic and Criminal Culture on a Shifting Terrain”, Paper presented to the fifth meeting of the Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (Home Office, 15th December 2000).Google Scholar
  30. Hughes, G., Understanding Crime Prevention (Open University Press, Buckingham, 1998).Google Scholar
  31. Jamieson, A., “The Transnational Dimension of Italian Organised Crime”, Transnational Organised Crime 1995 (1:2).Google Scholar
  32. King, M. and B. Bogusz, “Implementing European Union Illicit Drug Trafficking Controls in Central Europe: critical observations from the Czech Republic, Hungary and Lithuania”, Paper presented to the fifth meeting of the Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (Home Office, 15th December 2000).Google Scholar
  33. Klerks, P., “The Network Paradigm Applied to Criminal Organisations: Theoretical nitpicking or a relevant doctrine for investigators? Recent Developments in the Netherlands”, Paper presented to the inaugural meeting of the Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Leicester, 8th September 1999).Google Scholar
  34. Kooiman, J., “Findings, Speculations and Recommendations”, in J. Kooiman (ed.), Modern Governance: New Government-Society Interactions (London: Sage, 1993).Google Scholar
  35. Levi, M., “Perspectives on Organised Crime: An Overview”, The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice 1998 (37:4), 335–345.Google Scholar
  36. Levi, M., “Attacking the Money Trail: the research evidence”. Paper presented to the 3rd meeting of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Cardiff, 5th April 2000).Google Scholar
  37. Lidstone, K. et al., Prosecutions by Private Individuals and Non-Police Agencies (Royal Commission on Criminal Procedure, Research Study 10, 1980).Google Scholar
  38. Longrigg, C., Mafia Women (London: Vintage, 1997).Google Scholar
  39. McKenna, F., “Asset Confiscation: the Irish experience”. Paper presented to the 3rd meeting of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Cardiff, 5th April 2000).Google Scholar
  40. Mayntz, R., “Governing Failures and the Problem of Governability”, in J. Kooiman (ed.), Modern Governance: New Government-Society Interactions (London: Sage, 1993).Google Scholar
  41. Myers III, W.H., “The Emerging Threat of Transnational Organised Crime from the East”, Crime, Law and Social Change 1996 (24).Google Scholar
  42. Naylor, R.T., “Mafias, myths, and Markets: on the theory and practice of enterprise crime,” Transnational Organized Crime 1997 (3:3), Autumn, 1–4.Google Scholar
  43. NCIS, Service Plan 1999–2000 (London: NCIS, 1999).Google Scholar
  44. Nelken, D., “White-Collar Crime”, in M. Maguire et al. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, 2nd Edition (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1997).Google Scholar
  45. Raine, L.P. and F.J. Cilluffo, Global Organized Crime: The New Empire of Evil (Washington DC: Centre for Strategic and International Studies, 1994).Google Scholar
  46. Rawlinson, P., “Russian Organized Crime: A Brief History”, Transnational Organized Crime 1997 (2:2–3), 28–52.Google Scholar
  47. Rawlinson, P., “Mafia, Media and Myth: Representations of Russian Organised Crime”, The Howard Journal 1998 (37:4), 346–358.Google Scholar
  48. Rawlinson, P., “Bad Boys in the Baltics?”, Paper presented to the fifth meeting of the Ecnomic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (Home Office, London, 15th December 2000).Google Scholar
  49. Rogovin, C.H. and F.T. Martens, “The Evil That Men Do,” in P.J. Ryan and G.E. Rush (eds.), Understanding Organized Crime in Global Perspective (Thousand Oaks, Sage, 1997) pp. 26–36.Google Scholar
  50. Ruggiero, V., Organised and Corporate Crime in Europe. Offers that Can't Be Refused (Aldershot: Dartmouth, 1996).Google Scholar
  51. Ruggiero, V., “Transnational Criminal Activities: The Provision of Services in the Dirty Economies”, International Journal of Risk, Security and Crime Prevention 1998 (3:2), 121–129.Google Scholar
  52. Ruggiero, V., Crime and Markets. Essays in Anti-Criminology (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).Google Scholar
  53. Sheptycki, J., “The Global Cops Cometh”, British Journal of Sociology March 1998.Google Scholar
  54. Sparrow, M.K., Imposing Duties: Government's changing approach to compliance (Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1994).Google Scholar
  55. Stelfox, P., “Policing Lower Levels of Organised Crime in England and Wales,” The Howard Journal 1998 (37:4), November, 393–406.Google Scholar
  56. Stelfox, P., “Transnational Organised Crime: A selective police perspective”, Paper presented to the second meeting of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Leicester, 15th December 1999).Google Scholar
  57. Sutherland, E., White Collar Crime: the uncut version (Holt Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1983).Google Scholar
  58. Taylor, I., Crime in Context: a critical criminology of market societies (Cambridge, Polity Press, 1999).Google Scholar
  59. Tilly, C., “War Making and State Making as Organized Crime,” in P. Evans et al. (eds.), Bringing the State Back In (Cambridge University Press, 1985) pp. 161–191.Google Scholar
  60. Van Duyne, P., “Money Laundering: links between the ‘underworld' and ‘upperworld'”, Paper presented to the 3rd meeting of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Cardiff, 5th April 2000).Google Scholar
  61. Voronin, Y.A., “The Emerging Criminal State: Economic and Political Aspects of Organised Crime in Russia”, Transnational Organised Crime 1996 (2:2–3), 53–62.Google Scholar
  62. Werdmolder, H., “Moroccan Organised Crime in the Netherlands”, International Journal of Risk, Security and Crime Prevention 1998 (3:2), 111–120.Google Scholar
  63. Williams, P. (ed.), Russian Organised Crime: The New Threat (London: Frank Cass, 1997).Google Scholar
  64. Woodiwiss, M., “Crime's Global Reach,” in F. Pearce and Woodiwiss (eds.), Global Crime Connections: dynamics and control (Basingstoke: MacMillan, 1993) pp. 1–31.Google Scholar
  65. Woodiwiss, M., “Transnational Organised Crime: Strange Career of an American Concept” Paper presented to the inaugural meeting of the Economic and Social Research Council's Research Seminar Series on Policy Responses to Transnational Organised Crime (University of Leicester, 8th September 1999).Google Scholar
  66. World in Action, broadcast on 28 October and 4 November 1996.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam Edwards
    • 1
  • Pete Gill
    • 2
  1. 1.Nottingham Crime Research Unit, Department of Social SciencesNottingham Trent UniversityNottingham
  2. 2.Centre for Criminal JusticeLiverpool John Moore's UniversityLiverpoolUK

Personalised recommendations