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Coping Resources, Perceived Stress, and Life Satisfaction Among Turkish and American University Students

  • Kenneth B. Matheny
  • William L. Curlette
  • Ferda Aysan
  • Anna Herrington
  • Coleman Allen Gfroerer
  • Dennis Thompson
  • Errol Hamarat
Article

Abstract

This study investigated coping resources (Coping Resources Inventory for Stress), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), and life satisfaction (Satisfaction with Life Scale) among American and Turkish university students. Results support the use of transactional stress constructs in studying life satisfaction with students in both countries. American and Turkish students did not differ significantly in regard to perceived stress, life satisfaction, or an overall measure of coping resources; however, they did differ significantly regarding specific coping resources. Variables entering regression models for predicting life satisfaction differed for students in the two countries and for the sexes within countries, and these models accounted for between 30% and 62% of variance. Social support and a sense of financial freedom were particularly useful in predicting life satisfaction. Coping resources accounted for 54% of variance in perceived stress. There were significant sex differences for both countries, generally favoring males, in regard to specific coping resources.

stress coping resources life satisfaction university students cross cultural 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth B. Matheny
    • 1
  • William L. Curlette
    • 2
  • Ferda Aysan
    • 3
  • Anna Herrington
    • 1
  • Coleman Allen Gfroerer
    • 1
  • Dennis Thompson
    • 4
  • Errol Hamarat
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Counseling and Psychological ServicesGeorgia State University, University PlazaAtlanta
  2. 2.Department of Educational Policy StudiesGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaGeorgia
  3. 3.Department of Teacher TrainingDokuz Eylul UniversityIzmetTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Educational Psychology and Special EducationGeorgia State UniversityAtlantaGeorgia

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