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The Boston Area Diary Study and the Moral Citizenship of Care

  • Paul G. Schervish
  • John J. Havens
Article

Abstract

This paper describes the theoretical foundations, empirical findings, and practical and philosophical implications of the Boston Area Diary Study (BADS), a study of the caring behavior of 44 participants over one calendar year. In particular, the paper presents an identification theory of care and discusses how it shaped the conceptualization, collection, and analysis of the data in a year-long diary study of daily voluntary assistance. The findings from the BADS (1) theoretically confirm the identification theory of care; (2) methodologically capture how individuals perceive and carry out caring behavior as a unity; and (3rpar; empirically document the existence of a moral citizenship in America that is substantially more vigorous than is implied by the usual indicators of civic and political citizenship.

diary study giving and volunteering moral citizenship care identification theory civil society Boston 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Third-Sector Research and The Johns Hopkins University 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul G. Schervish
    • 1
  • John J. Havens
    • 1
  1. 1.Boston CollegeSocial Welfare Research Institute

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