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Journal of Science Education and Technology

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 121–134 | Cite as

Constructivism and Science Education: A Further Appraisal

  • Michael R. Matthews
Article

Abstract

This paper is critical of constructivism. It examines the philosophical underpinnings of the theory, it outlines the impact of the doctrine on contemporary science education, it details the relativist and subjectivist interpretation of Thomas Kuhn's work found in constructivist writings, it indicates the problems that constructivist theory places in the way of teaching the content of science, and finally it suggests that a lot of old-fashioned, perfectly reasonable educational truisms and concepts are needlessly cloaked in constructivist jargon that inhibites communication with educationalists and policy makers.

constructivism epistemology Thomas Kuhn 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael R. Matthews
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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