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Magnetic resonance imaging of coronary artery occlusions in the navigator technique

  • Thomas Wittlinger
  • Thomas Voigtländer
  • Martin Rohr
  • Jürgen Meyer
  • Martin Thelen
  • Karl Friedrich Kreitner
  • Peter Kalden
Article

Abstract

Non-invasive assessment of coronary arteries is possible with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Respiratory gated MR coronary angiography is a new imaging technique that permits reconstruction of the coronary arteries based on a three-dimensional (3D) data set obtained from the free-breathing patient. In this study, respiratory gated MR angiography (MRA) was performed to assess coronary artery occlusions. MRI was performed in 25 patients who had been referred for conventional coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Coronary artery occlusion was evaluated in the proximal and middle vessel segments after multiplanar coronary reconstruction of the MR images. Five patients were excluded from the study; in the remaining 20 patients 120 coronary artery segments were analyzed. Good image quality could be obtained for 85% of the segments. Eighteen of the 24 occlusions were confirmed by MRI, the overall sensitivity was 75% and the specificity was 100%. The best results were found in the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) and descending parts of the right coronary artery (RCA), where all occlusions were confirmed. These results showed that coronary artery occlusions can be detected in the proximal and middle LAD and RCA using 3D respiratory gated MRA. Further technical improvements, especially in spatial resolution, are necessary before MRA can become a reliable diagnostic tool in the non-invasive evaluation of coronary arteries.

coronary artery occlusions 3D navigator sequence MR coronary angiography respiratory gating 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Wittlinger
    • 1
  • Thomas Voigtländer
    • 1
  • Martin Rohr
    • 1
  • Jürgen Meyer
    • 1
  • Martin Thelen
    • 2
  • Karl Friedrich Kreitner
    • 2
  • Peter Kalden
    • 2
  1. 1.2nd Clinical CenterUniversity Hospital MainzMainzGermany
  2. 2.Clinic for RadiologyUniversity Hospital MainzMainzGermany

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