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International Journal of Computer Vision

, Volume 47, Issue 1–3, pp 149–160 | Cite as

Panoramic Depth Imaging: Single Standard Camera Approach

  • Peter Peer
  • Franc Solina
Article

Abstract

In this paper we present a panoramic depth imaging system. The system is mosaic-based which means that we use a single rotating camera and assemble the captured images in a mosaic. Due to a setoff of the camera's optical center from the rotational center of the system we are able to capture the motion parallax effect which enables stereo reconstruction. The camera is rotating on a circular path with a step defined by the angle, equivalent to one pixel column of the captured image. The equation for depth estimation can be easily extracted from the system geometry. To find the corresponding points on a stereo pair of panoramic images the epipolar geometry needs to be determined. It can be shown that the epipolar geometry is very simple if we are doing the reconstruction based on a symmetric pair of stereo panoramic images. We get a symmetric pair of stereo panoramic images when we take symmetric pixel columns on the left and on the right side from the captured image center column. Epipolar lines of the symmetrical pair of panoramic images are image rows. The search space on the epipolar line can be additionaly constrained. The focus of the paper is mainly on the system analysis. Results of the stereo reconstruction procedure and quality evaluation of generated depth images are quite promissing. The system performs well for reconstruction of small indoor spaces. Our finall goal is to develop a system for automatic navigation of a mobile robot in a room.

stereo vision reconstruction panoramic image mosaicing 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Peer
    • 1
  • Franc Solina
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Computer and Information ScienceLjubljanaSlovenia

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