International Journal of Computer Vision

, Volume 47, Issue 1–3, pp 51–61

Trinocular Stereo: A Real-Time Algorithm and its Evaluation

  • Jane Mulligan
  • Volkan Isler
  • Kostas Daniilidis
Article

Abstract

In telepresence applications each user is immersed in a rendered 3D-world composed from representations transmitted from remote sites. The challenge is to compute dense range data at high frame rates, since participants cannot easily communicate if the processing cycle or network latencies are long. Moreover, errors in new stereoscopic views of the remote 3D-world should be hardly perceptible. To achieve the required speed and accuracy, we use trinocular stereo, a matching algorithm based on the sum of modified normalized cross-correlations, and subpixel disparity interpolation. To increase speed we use Intel IPL functions in the pre-processing steps of background subtraction and image rectification as well as a four-processor parallelization. To evaluate our system we have developed a test-bed which provides a set of registered dense “ground-truth” laser data and image data from multiple views.

trinocular stereo telepresence ground-truth evaluation error metrics 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Mulligan
    • 1
  • Volkan Isler
    • 2
  • Kostas Daniilidis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of Colorado at BoulderBoulder
  2. 2.GRASP LaboratoryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia

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