BioControl

, Volume 47, Issue 1, pp 23–31

Parasitoid diversity and impact on populations of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (L.) on Brassica crops in central México

  • M. Martínez-Castillo
  • J.L. Leyva
  • J. Cibrián-Tovar
  • R. Bujanos-Muñiz
Article

Abstract

Three experimental plots were established and maintained during one year at two sites in the state of Querétaro, México, in order to identify species of parasitoids attacking the diamondback moth (DBM) Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), and to gather information concerning their relative importance and patterns of population fluctuation. At both sites, the plots were planted with broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower during three cropping seasons. Parasitoid species identified were: Diadegma insulare Cresson, Diadromus (= Thyraeella) collaris Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae); Habrobracon sp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae); Oomyzus (= Tetrastichus) sokolowoskii Kurdjumov (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae); and Spilochalcis (= Conura) sp. (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae). This last species is a hyperparasitoid of D. insulare. The most abundant and frequently occurring species was D. insulare, it occurred in both localities during all three cropping seasons. The highest levels of parasitism caused by D. insulare on DBM were registered in the spring-summer season of 1996 at `La Soledad' farm with averages of 42.7, 45.0 and 44.5% on cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower, respectively. Because D. insulare was detected attacking the pest at very low population densities during the initial stages of the crop cycle, it is assumed that the parasitoid has a high searching capacity. Correlation (r) between DBM and D. insulare population numbers was positive and significant. The other species identified occurred sporadically and had little impact on pest populations. The identification of D. collaris represents the first record of this species in North America.

biodiversity biological control crucifer pests natural enemies natural control 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bujanos, M.R., A. Marín Jarillo, F. Galván Castillo and F.K. Byerly Murphy, 1993. Manejo integrado de la palomilla dorso de diamante Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae) en el Bajío, México. Comité Técnico de la Asociación de Procesadores y Exportadores de Frutas y Vegetales en General. Celaya, Gto. México.Google Scholar
  2. Carballo, M., M. Hernández and J.R. Quezada, 1989. Efectos de los insecticidas y de las malezas sobre Plutella xylostella (L.) y su parasitoide Diadegma insulare (Cress) en el cultivo del repollo. Manejo Integrado de Plagas 11: 1–20.Google Scholar
  3. Cordero, J. and R.D. Cave, 1992. Natural enemies of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on crucifers in Honduras. Entomophaga 37: 397–407.Google Scholar
  4. Fitton, M. and A. Walker, 1992. Hymenopterous parasitoids associated with diamondback moth: the taxonomic dilemma. In: N.S. Talekar (ed), Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests: Proc. of the Second International Workshop, 10–14 December 1990, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 225–232.Google Scholar
  5. Goodwin, S., 1979. Changes in numbers in the parasitoid complex associatied with the diamodback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera) in Victoria. Aust. J. Zool. 27: 981–989.Google Scholar
  6. Idris, A.B. and E. Grafius, 1995. Wildflowers as nectar sources for Diadegma insulare (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), a parasitoid of diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae). Environ. Entomol. 24: 1726–1735.Google Scholar
  7. Idris, A.B. and E. Grafius, 1996. Effects of wild and cultivated host plants on oviposition, survival, and development of diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) and its parasitoid Diadegma insulare (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). Environ. Entomol. 25: 825–833.Google Scholar
  8. INEGI, 1986. Síntesis geográfica, nomenclator y anexo cartográfico del Estado de Querétaro. Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, México.Google Scholar
  9. INEGI, 1995. Anuario estadístico del Estado de Querétaro de Arteaga. Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, México.Google Scholar
  10. Jervis, M. and N. Kidd, 1996. Population dynamics. In: Insect Natural Enemies. Practical Approaches to their Study and Evaluation. Chapman & Hall, London, UK. pp. 223–292.Google Scholar
  11. Lim, G.S., 1986. Biological control of diamondback moth. In: N.S. Talekar and T.D. Griggs (eds.), Diamondback Moth Management: Proc. of the First International Workshop, 11–15 March 1982, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 156–167.Google Scholar
  12. McCully, J.E. and M.D. Salas, 1992. Seasonal variation in populations of the principal insects causing contamination in processing broccoli and cauliflower in Central Mexico. In: N.S. Talekar (ed), Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests: Proc. of the Second International Workshop, 10–14 December 1990, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 51–63.Google Scholar
  13. Morallo-Rejesus, B. and A. Sayaboc, 1992. Management of diamondback moth with Cotesia plutellae: prospects in the Philippines. In: N.S. Talekar (ed), Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests: Proc. of the Second International Workshop, 10–14 December 1990, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 279–286.Google Scholar
  14. Poelking, A., 1992. Diamondback moth in the Philippines and its control with Diadegma semicalusum. In: N.S. Talekar (ed), Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests: Proc. of the Second International Workshop, 10–14 December 1990, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 297–308.Google Scholar
  15. Quicke, D.L.J., 1997. Subfamily Braconinae. In: R.A. Wharton, P.M. Marsh and M.J. Sharkey (eds), Manual of the New World Genera of the Family Braconidae. International Society of Hymenopterists, Special Publication No. 1, Washington, D.C. pp. 149–174.Google Scholar
  16. Salinas, P.J., 1986. Studies on diamondback moth in Venezuela with reference to other Latinoamerican countries. In: N.S. Talekar and T.D. Griggs (eds), Diamondback Moth Management: Proc. of the First International Workshop, 11–15 March 1982, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 17–24.Google Scholar
  17. SAS Institute, 1987. SAS/STAT user's guide, release 4.04 ed. SAS Institute, Cary, N.C.Google Scholar
  18. Shigekazu, W., R. Tsukuta and F. Nakasuji, 1992. Effects of natural enemies, rainfall, temperature and host plants on survival and reproduction of the diamondback moth. In: N.S. Talekar (ed), Diamondback Moth and other Crucifer Pests: Proc. of the Second International Workshop, 10–14 December 1990, Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan. pp. 15–26.Google Scholar
  19. Talekar, N.S. and A.M. Shelton, 1993. Biology, ecology, and management of the diamondback moth. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 38: 275–301.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Martínez-Castillo
    • 1
  • J.L. Leyva
    • 1
  • J. Cibrián-Tovar
    • 1
  • R. Bujanos-Muñiz
    • 2
  1. 1.Colegio de PostgraduadosInstituto de FitosanidadMontecillo, Estado de MéxicoMéxico
  2. 2.Agrícolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP), CEBAJ-CIR-CentroInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones ForestalesCelaya, GuanajuatoMéxico

Personalised recommendations