Transportation

, Volume 29, Issue 2, pp 125–143 | Cite as

Demand for rail travel to and from airports

  • W.F. Lythgoe
  • M. Wardman

Abstract

Rail access to airports is becoming increasingly important for both train operators and the airports themselves. This paper reports analysis of inter-urban rail demand to and from Manchester and Stansted Airports and the sensitivity of this market segment to growth in air traffic and the cost and service quality of rail services. The estimated demand parameters vary in an expected manner between outward and inward air travellers as well as between airport users and general rail travellers. These parameters can be entered into the demand forecasting framework widely used in the rail industry in Great Britain to provide an appropriate means of forecasting for this otherwise neglected market segment. The novel features of this research, at least in the British context, are that it provides the first detailed analysis of aggregate rail flows to and from airports, it has disaggregated the traditional generalised time measure of rail service quality in order to estimate separate elasticities to journey time, service headway and interchange, and it has successfully explored departures from the conventional constant elasticity position.

airport access demand forecasting elasticities railways 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • W.F. Lythgoe
    • 1
  • M. Wardman
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Leeds, ITSLeedsUK

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