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Using Qualitative Assessment in Career Counselling

  • Mary Mcmahon
  • Wendy Patton
Article

Abstract

Advancements in conceptualisations about career and career development and irreversible changes in the world of work have necessitated that career counsellors reflect on their practice in order that it keeps pace and maintains relevancy.Fundamental to these reflections isconsideration of the place and nature of career assessment in career counselling.Traditionally, emphasis has been given toquantitative assessment. More recently, theprofile of qualitative assessment has beenraised, and its place in career counselling hasbeen strengthened relative to but not to theexclusion of quantitative assessment. However,there is little to guide the use of qualitativeassessment. This paper presents a theoreticaloverview of qualitative assessment in careercounselling and proposes guidelines for usingqualitative assessment.

Keywords

Quantitative Assessment Career Development Qualitative Assessment Career Assessment Irreversible Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Mcmahon
    • 1
  • Wendy Patton
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Learning and DevelopmentQueensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove CampusKelvin GroveAustralia

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