Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 37–52 | Cite as

Predictor Variables Associated with Positive Fast Track Outcomes at the End of Third Grade

  • Karen Bierman
Article

Abstract

Progress has been made in understanding the outcome effects of preventive interventions and treatments designed to reduce children's conduct problems. However, limited research has explored the factors that may affect the degree to which an intervention is likely to benefit particular individuals. This study examines selected child, family, and community baseline characteristics that may predict proximal outcomes from the Fast Track intervention. The primary goal of this study was to examine predictors of outcomes after 3 years of intervention participation, at the end of 3rd grade. Three types of proximal outcomes were examined: parent-rated aggression, teacher-rated oppositional–aggressive behavior, and special education involvement. The relation between 11 risk factors and these 3 outcomes was examined, with separate regression analyses for the intervention and control groups. Moderate evidence of prediction of outcome effects was found, although none of the baseline variables were found to predict all 3 outcomes, and different patterns of prediction emerged for home versus school outcomes.

conduct-problems prevention prediction 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Achenbach, T. M. (1991). Integrative guide for the 1991 CBCL/4–18, YSR and TRF profiles. Burlington: University of Vermont.Google Scholar
  2. Achenbach, T. M., McConaughy, S. H., & Howell, C. T. (1987). Child/adolescent behavioral and emotional problems: Implications of cross-informant correlations for situational specificity. Psychological Bulletin, 101, 213–232.Google Scholar
  3. Bellanti, C. J., Bierman, K. L., & Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (2000). Disentangling the impact of low cognitive ability and inattention on social behavior and peer relationships. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 29, 66–75.Google Scholar
  4. Bierman, K. L., Greenberg, M. T., & Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1996). Social skills training in the Fast Track program. In R. D. Peters & R. J. McMahon (Eds.), Preventing childhood disorders, substance abuse, and delinquency (pp. 65–89). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  5. Brestan, E. V., & Eyberg, S. M. (1998). Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct-disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 27, 180–189.Google Scholar
  6. Chamberlain, P., & Reid, J. B. (1987). Parent observation and report of child symptoms. Behavioral Assessment, 9, 97–109.Google Scholar
  7. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1992). A developmental and clinical model for the prevention of conduct disorders: The FAST Track program. Development and Psychopathology, 4, 509–527.Google Scholar
  8. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1999a). Initial impact of the Fast Track prevention trial for conduct problems: I. The high-risk sample. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 67, 631–647.Google Scholar
  9. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (2002a). Evaluation of the first three years of the Fast Track prevention trial with children at high-risk for adolescent conduct problems. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 30(1), 19–35.Google Scholar
  10. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (2002b). The implementation of the Fast Track program: An example of a large-scale prevention science efficacy trial. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 30(1), 1–17.Google Scholar
  11. Copeland, A. P., & Hammel, R. (1981). Subject variables in cognitive self-instructional training. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 5, 405–420.Google Scholar
  12. Crnic, K. A., & Greenberg, M. T. (1990). Minor parenting stresses with young children. Child Development, 61, 1628–1637.Google Scholar
  13. Dadds, M. R., & McHugh, T. A. (1992). Social support and treatment outcome in behavioral family therapy for child conduct problems. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 60, 252–259.Google Scholar
  14. Dumas, J. E. (1984). Child, adult-interactional, socioeconomic setting events as predictors of parent training outcome. Education and Treatment of Children, 7, 351–364.Google Scholar
  15. Dumas, J. E. (1986). Parental perception and treatment outcome in families of aggressive children: A causal model. Behavior Therapy, 17, 420–432.Google Scholar
  16. Dumas, J. E., & Albin, J. B. (1986). Parent training outcome: Does active parental involvement matter? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 24, 227–230.Google Scholar
  17. Dumas, J. E., & Wahler, R. G. (1983). Predictors of treatment outcome in parent training: Mother insularity and socioeconomic disadvantage. Behavioral Assessment, 5, 301–313.Google Scholar
  18. Durlak, J. A., Wells, A. M., Cotton, J. K., & Johnson, S. (1995). Analysis of selected methodological issues in child psychotherapy research. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 24, 141–148.Google Scholar
  19. Fleischman, M. J. (1981). A replication of Patterson's “Intervention for boys with conduct problems.” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 49, 342–351.Google Scholar
  20. Greenberg, M. T., Lengua, L. J., Coie, J. D., Pinderhughes, E. E., & Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1999). Predicting developmental outcomes at school entry using a multiple risk model: Four American communities. Developmental Psychology, 35, 403–417.Google Scholar
  21. Hawkins, J. D., Von Cleve, E., & Catalano, R. F. (1991). Reducing early childhood aggression: Results of a primary prevention program. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 30, 208–217.Google Scholar
  22. Henggeler, S. W., Melton, G. B., & Smith, L. A. (1992). Family preservation using Multisystemic Therapy: An effective alternative to incarcerating serious juvenile offenders. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 60, 953–961.Google Scholar
  23. Holden, G. W., Lavigne, V. V., & Cameron, A. M. (1990). Probing the continuum of effectiveness of parent training: Characteristics of parents and preschoolers. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 19, 2–8.Google Scholar
  24. Hollingshead, A. A. (1979). Four-factor index of social status. Unpublished manuscript, Yale University, New Haven, CT.Google Scholar
  25. Horne, A. M., & van Dyke, B. (1983). Treatment and maintenance of social learning family therapy. Behavior Therapy, 14, 606–638.Google Scholar
  26. Kazdin, A. E. (1995). Child, parent and family dysfunction as predictors of outcome in cognitive-behavioral treatment of antisocial children. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33, 271–281.Google Scholar
  27. Kazdin, A. E., & Crowley, M. J. (1997). Moderators of treatment outcome in cognitively based treatment of antisocial children. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 21, 185–207.Google Scholar
  28. Kazdin, A. E., & Weisz, J. R. (1998). Identifying and developing empirically supported child and adolescent treatments. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 19–36.Google Scholar
  29. Kellam, S. G., Rebok, G. W., Ialongo, N., & Mayer, L. S. (1994). The course and malleability of aggressive behavior from early first grade into midle school: Results of a developmental epidemiologically based preventive trial. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 35, 259–281.Google Scholar
  30. Little, R. J. A., & Rubin, D. B. (1987). Statistical analysis with missing data. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  31. Lochman, J. E. (1990). Modification of childhood aggression. In M. Hersen, R. Eisler, & P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification (Vol. 25, pp. 47–85). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  32. Lochman, J. E. (2000). Parent and family skills training in targeted prevention programs for at-risk youth. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 21, 253–265.Google Scholar
  33. Lochman, J. E., & Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1995). Screening of child behavior problems for prevention programs at school entry. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63, 549–559.Google Scholar
  34. Lochman, J. E., Lampron, L. B., Burch, P. R., & Curry, J. F. (1985). Client characteristics associated with behavior change for treated and untreated aggressive boys. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 13, 527–538.Google Scholar
  35. McMahon, R. J., Forehand, R., Griest, D. L., & Wells, K. C. (1981). Who drops out of therapy during parent behavioral training? Behavior Counseling Quarterly, 1, 79–85.Google Scholar
  36. McMahon, R. J., Slough, N., & Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1996). Family-based intervention in the Fast Track program. In R. D. Peters & R. J. McMahon (Eds.), Preventing childhood disorders, substance abuse, and delinquency (pp. 90–110). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  37. McMahon, R. J., & Wells, K. C. (1998). Conduct problems. In E. J. Mash & R. A. Barkley (Eds.), Treatment of childhood disorders (2nd ed., pp. 111–207). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  38. Muthen, L. K., & Muthen, B. O. (1998). Mplus user's guide. Los Angeles, CA: Muthen & Muthen.Google Scholar
  39. Paul, G. L. (1967). Insight vs. desensitization in psychotherapy two years after termination. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 31, 333–348.Google Scholar
  40. Quay, H. C., & Peterson, D. R. (1987). Manual for the Revised Problem Behavior Checklist. Available from H. C. Quay, University of Miami, Box 248074, Coral Gables, FL 33124.Google Scholar
  41. Radloff, L. S. (1977). The CES-D Scale: A self-report depression scale for research in the general population. Applied Psychological Measurement, 1, 385–401.Google Scholar
  42. Rogers, T. R., Forehand, R., Griest, D. L., Wells, K. C., & McMahon, R. J. (1981). Socioeconomic status: Effects on parent and child behaviors and treatment outcome of parent training. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 10, 98–101.Google Scholar
  43. Ruma, P. R., Burke, R. V., & Thompson, R. W. (1996). Group parent training: Is it effective for children of all ages? Behavior Therapy, 27, 159–169.Google Scholar
  44. Serketich, W. J., & Dumas, J. E. (1996). The effectiveness of behavioral parent training to modify antisocial behavior in children: A meta-analysis. Behavior Therapy, 27, 171–186.Google Scholar
  45. Stormshak, E. A., Bierman, K. L., & Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group. (1998). The implications of different developmental patterns of disruptive behavior problems for school adjustment. Development and Psychopathology, 10, 451–467.Google Scholar
  46. Strain, P. S., Steele, P., Ellis, T., & Timm, M. A. (1982). Long-term effects of oppositional child treatment with mothers as therapists and therapist trainers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 15, 163–169.Google Scholar
  47. Thompson, R. W., Grow, C. R., Ruma, P. R., Daly, D. L., & Burke, R. V. (1993). Evaluation of a practical parenting program with middle-and low-income families. Family Relations, 42, 21–25.Google Scholar
  48. Wahler, R. G. (1980). The insular mother: Her problems in parent-child treatment. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 13, 207–219.Google Scholar
  49. Wahler, R. G., & Graves, M. G. (1983). Setting events in social networks: Ally or enemy in child behavior therapy? Behavior Therapy, 14, 19–36.Google Scholar
  50. Webster-Stratton, C. (1985). Predictors of treatment outcome in parent training for conduct disordered children. Behavior Therapy, 16, 223–243.Google Scholar
  51. Webster-Stratton, C. (1996). Early-onset conduct problems: Does gender make a difference? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64, 540–551.Google Scholar
  52. Webster-Stratton, C., & Hammond, M. (1990). Predictors of treatment outcome in parent training for families with conduct problem children. Behavior Therapy, 21, 319–337.Google Scholar
  53. Wechsler, D. (1974). Manual for the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children—Revised. New York: Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
  54. Werthamer-Larsson, L., Kellam, S. G., & Wheeler, L. (1991). Effects of first grade classroom environment on shy behavior, aggressive behavior, and concentration problems. American Journal of Community Psychology, 19, 585–602.Google Scholar
  55. Woodcock, R. W., & Johnson, M. B. (1990). Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery—Revised. Allen, TX: D. M. Teaching Resources.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Bierman

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations