Quality of Life Research

, Volume 10, Issue 8, pp 711–721 | Cite as

The WHO quality of life assessment instrument (WHOQOL-Bref): The importance of its items for cross-cultural research

  • Shekhar Saxena
  • Dawn Carlson
  • Rex Billington
  • John Orley
Article

Abstract

One of the fundamental issues in the area of assessment of quality of life is to determine what is important to the individuals' quality of life. This is even more crucial when the instrument is for use in diverse cultural settings. This paper reports on the importance ratings on WHOQOL-Bref items obtained as a part of WHOQOL pilot field trial on 4804 respondents from 15 centres from 14 developed and developing countries using 12 languages. All items were rated as moderately or more important, but this was expected because the items were selected by extensive qualitative research for their salience across the centres. Significant differences on mean importance ratings were found between centres, but rank orders of item for their importance showed highly significant correlations between centres. This was especially true for items in the top and the bottom thirds of the item list arranged by overall importance. Most items were rated as more important by women compared to men and by younger compared to older persons. The results are discussed for their relevance in cross-cultural research on quality of life assessment.

Age Cross-cultural validation Gender Measurement Quality of life WHOQOL 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shekhar Saxena
    • 1
  • Dawn Carlson
    • 1
  • Rex Billington
    • 1
  • John Orley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mental health and Substance DependenceWorld Health OrganisationGenevaSwitzerland

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