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Journal of Adult Development

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 61–70 | Cite as

Toward a Psychology of Religion, Spirituality, Meaning-Search, and Aging: Past Research and a Practical Application

  • Lauren S. Seifert
Article

Abstract

The current work is a combined review of several major theoretical issues in religious gerontology and of related research findings. It is intended to briefly inform, rather than to serve as a comprehensive review of the literature. The current author's primary goals are to put-forth points of information about contemporary terminology, to conceptualize motives for meaning-search at any age, to synthesize a few major findings and associated flaws in the research, and to describe a practical approach to the psychology of religion and spirituality (i.e., coping outcomes research). Within the current work, the reader is directed to sources of extensive reviews of data and of broader theoretical debates.

religious gerontology religiousness religious coping spiritual development spiritual well-being 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMalone CollegeN.W. Canton

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