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Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 259–283 | Cite as

Becoming a Mathematics Teacher-Educator: Conceptualizing the Terrain Through Self-Reflective Analysis

  • Ron Tzur
Article

Abstract

My purpose in this article is to contribute tothe conceptualization of the complex terrainthat often is indiscriminately termedmathematics teacher educator development.Because this terrain is largely unresearched, Iinterweave experience fragments of my owndevelopment as a mathematics teacher educator,and reflective analysis of those fragments, asa tool to abstract notions of generalimplication. In particular, I postulate aframework consisting of four stages ofdevelopment that are distinguished by thedomain of activities one's reflections mayfocus on and the nature of those reflections.Drawing on this framework, I presentimplications for mathematics teacher educatordevelopment and for further research.

Keywords

Teacher Educator Education Research Mathematics Teacher Abstract Notion Mathematics Teacher Educator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ron Tzur
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mathematics, Science, and Technology EducationNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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