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Cancer and Metastasis Reviews

, Volume 20, Issue 1–2, pp 63–68 | Cite as

Drug Resistance in Cancer: A Perspective

  • James H. Goldie
Article

Abstract

Drug resistance remains the thorniest obstacle in developing improved systemic therapies for disseminated cancer. The combination of genetic instability together with the great molecular heterogeneity that are displayed by malignant cells makes constructing effective, rational treatment programs difficult in the extreme. However, new insights into the action of antitumor agents at the molecular level plus greater understanding of the relationship of drug resistant states to the fundamental abnormalities that generate malignancy point the way to producing therapies that are more specific and therapeutically effective. However, a non-trival problem is the drug development system itself which is currently poorly set up to yield patient specific drug programs in a timely fashion.

acquired resistance intrinsic resistance quasi-species resistance modulation randomized clinical trial 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • James H. Goldie
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Research CentreVancouverCanada

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