Water, Air and Soil Pollution: Focus

, Volume 1, Issue 5–6, pp 447–454

Methane Fluxes from a Wetland using the Flux-Gradient Technique The Measurement of Methane Flux from a Natural Wetland Pond and Adjacent Vegetated Wetlands using a TDL-Based Flux-Gradient Technique

  • G. C. Edwards
  • G. M. Dias
  • G. W. Thurtell
  • G. E. Kidd
  • N. T. Roulet
  • C. A. Kelly
  • J. W. M. Rudd
  • A. Moore
  • L. Halfpenny-Mitchell
Article

Abstract

Methane emissions were measured from a bog andlake in the Experimental Lakes Area in Northern Ontario in 1992and 1993, prior to and following flooding. Bog fluxes were smallin 1992 (0.27 mg m-2 d-1) but increased 5-fold in 1993 afterflooding. Over the bog, there was a diel cycle of nighttimeemission and daytime uptake in 1992 in contrast to constantemission in 1993. Lake emissions decreased after flooding butwere much greater than bog emissions in both years (average = 7.3 mg m-2 d-1). Seasonally, the bog flux was correlated withground temperatures after flooding. In 1992, lake fluxes werecorrelated with air temperature on a daily basis. In contrast,seasonal lake fluxes were correlated with water and sedimenttemperatures in 1992, but only with sediment temperatures in1993. These results are explained with respect to the effects offlooding on lake and bog dynamics.

methane emissions micrometeorological measurements seasonal cycles wetland flooding 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. C. Edwards
    • 1
  • G. M. Dias
    • 1
  • G. W. Thurtell
    • 2
  • G. E. Kidd
    • 2
  • N. T. Roulet
    • 3
  • C. A. Kelly
    • 4
  • J. W. M. Rudd
    • 5
  • A. Moore
    • 2
  • L. Halfpenny-Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EngineeringUniversity of GuelphGuelphU.S.A.
  2. 2.Department of Land Resource ScienceUniversity of Guelph, Guelph, ONU.S.A
  3. 3.Department of GeographyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  4. 4.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegU.S.A
  5. 5.Department of Fisheries and OceansFreshwater InstituteWinnipegU.S.A

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