Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 781–799 | Cite as

Cognitive Self-Statements in Social Phobia: A Comparison Across Three Types of Social Situations

  • Maria B. Beazley
  • Carol R. Glass
  • Dianne L. Chambless
  • Diane B. Arnkoff
Article

Abstract

Many individuals with social phobia experience anxiety and negative cognitions in more than one social situation, yet few studies have considered the role of situational factors when assessing the cognitive content of those with social phobia. The present study, using the Social Interaction Self-Statement Test (SISST), examined the thoughts of 60 individuals diagnosed with social phobia across three social situations: a same-sex interaction; a different-sex interaction; and an impromptu speech. Results emphasize the importance of considering the type of situation when assessing thoughts of socially phobic individuals during social interactions. Most notable were differences found when comparing cognitions of different subgroups (generalized vs. nongeneralized social phobia) in the speech situation with their thought patterns in the social interaction situations. These findings suggest that a cognitive assessment that includes a range of behavioral tasks may be most helpful in diagnosis and treatment plan development. Results also offer support for the utility of the SISST negative subscale in both social interaction and speech situations.

social phobia self-statements cognitive-behavioral group therapy cognitive-behavioral assessment 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria B. Beazley
    • 1
  • Carol R. Glass
    • 2
  • Dianne L. Chambless
    • 3
  • Diane B. Arnkoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCatholic University of AmericaWashington
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCatholic University of AmericaWashington
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel Hill

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