Journal of Housing and the Built Environment

, Volume 16, Issue 3–4, pp 249–265 | Cite as

Modelling residential mobility; a review of recent trends in research

  • Frans M. Dieleman
Article

Abstract

Recent studies add to the large body ofliterature on residential mobility bypresenting a fresh view of the residentialmobility process. At the micro level, newresearch sheds light on the jointdecision-making by members of a householdregarding a residential move, and clarifies thelink between place of residence and place ofwork. There are also many new studies onfinding an alternative dwelling if the mostpreferred house is unavailable. Householdrelocation is strongly embedded in housingmarket conditions at the local and nationallevel. Recent studies analyse variations in themobility process over space and time.

housing bundle housing career housing market joint decision-making life course residential mobility turnover rate 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frans M. Dieleman
    • 1
  1. 1.Urban Research centre Utrecht, Faculty of Geographical SciencesUtrecht UniversityUtrechtthe Netherlands

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