Advertisement

Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 23, Issue 20, pp 1685–1689 | Cite as

Production of a cellulase-free xylanase from agricultural waste materials by a thermotolerant Streptomyces sp.

  • Charin Techapun
  • Suphawat Sinsuwongwat
  • Naiyatat Poosaran
  • Masanori Watanabe
  • Ken Sasaki
Article

Abstract

1444 microorganisms were isolated from soil samples from the northern Thai and screened at 55 °C by using basal medium supplemented with 1% carboxymethyl cellulose as a sole carbon source. One isolate, Streptomyces Ab106, had a high activity of a cellulase-free xylanase also without mannanase activity. The maximum cellulase-free xylanase activities of 3.5, 3.3, 3.1 and 2.7 IU were after growth of the organism with 1% (w/v) corn hull, corncob, bagasse and oat spelt xylan, respectively, at 55 °C for 6 days, respectively. The activity was more than 5 times higher than that at 35 °C.

agricultural wastes Streptomyces sp. thermotolerance xylanase 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Amare G,Gashaw M (1999) High-level xylanase production by alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. by using solid-state fermentation. Enzyme Microbiol. Technol. 25: 68-72.Google Scholar
  2. Archana A,Satyanarayana T (1997) Xylanase production by thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis A99 in solid-state fermentation. Enzyme Microbiol. Technol. 21: 12-17.Google Scholar
  3. Atlas RM,Parks LC (1993) Handbook of Microbiological Media. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 55 and 997.Google Scholar
  4. Bailey MJ,Biely P,Poutanen K (1992) Interlaboratory testing of methods for assay of xylanase activity. J. Biotechnol. 23: 257-270.Google Scholar
  5. Brosius J,Palmer JL,Kennedy JP,Noller HF (1978) Complete nucleotide sequence of a 16S ribisomal RNA gene from Escherichia coli. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75: 4801-4805.Google Scholar
  6. Cristine L,Blanco FI (1998) Xylanase production by a new alkalitolerant isolate of Bacillus. Biotechnol. Lett. 20: 243-246.Google Scholar
  7. Hopwood DA,Bibb MJ,Chater KF,Kieser T,Btuton CJ,Kieser HM,Lydiate DJ,Smith CP,Ward JM,Schrempf H (1985) Genetic Manipulation of Streptomyces: A Laboratory Manual. Norwich, UK: The John Innes Foundation.Google Scholar
  8. Marmur J (1961) A procedure for isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid from microorganisms. J. Mol. Biol. 3: 208-218.Google Scholar
  9. Rajoka MI,Malik KA (1997) Cellulase production by Cellulomonas biazotea cultured in media containing different cellulosic substrates. Bioresour. Technol. 59: 21-27.Google Scholar
  10. Samain E,Debeire P,Touzel JP (1997) High level production of a cellulase-free xylanase in glucose-limited fed batch cultures of a thermophilic Bacillus strain. J. Biotechnol. 58: 71-78.Google Scholar
  11. Subramaniyan S,Sandhia GS,Prema P (2001) Control of xylanase production without protease activity in Bacillus sp. by selection of nitrogen source. Biotechnol. Lett. 23: 368-371.Google Scholar
  12. Tuncer M,Ball AS,Rob A,Wilson MT (1999) Optimization of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzyme production by a thermophilic actinomycete Thermomonospora fusca BD25. Enzyme Microbiol. Technol. 25: 38-47.Google Scholar
  13. Weisburge WG,Burns SM,Pelletier DA,Lane DJ (1991) 16S Ribosomal DNA amplification for phylogenetic study. J. Bacteriol. 73: 97-703.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charin Techapun
    • 1
  • Suphawat Sinsuwongwat
    • 1
  • Naiyatat Poosaran
    • 1
  • Masanori Watanabe
    • 2
  • Ken Sasaki
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-IndustryChiangmai UniversityChiangmaiThailand
  2. 2.Material Science and EngineeringHiroshima Kokusai Gakuin UniversityHiroshimaJapan

Personalised recommendations