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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 29, Issue 6, pp 499–511 | Cite as

Somatic Markers and Response Reversal: Is There Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Boys with Psychopathic Tendencies?

  • R. J. R. Blair
  • E. Colledge
  • D. G. V. Mitchell
Article

Abstract

This study investigated the performance of boys with psychopathic tendencies and comparison boys, aged 9 to 17 years, on two tasks believed to be sensitive to amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex functioning. Fifty-one boys were divided into two groups according to the Psychopathy Screening Device (PSD, P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, in press) and presented with two tasks. The tasks were the gambling task (A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio, & S. W. Anderson, 1994) and the Intradimensional/Extradimensional (ID/ED) shift task (R. Dias, T. W. Robbins, & A. C. Roberts, 1996). The boys with psychopathic tendencies showed impaired performance on the gambling task. However, there were no group differences on the ID/ED task either for response reversal or extradimensional set shifting. The implications of these results for models of psychopathy are discussed.

amygdala orbitofrontal cortex psychopathic tendencies psychopathy 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. R. Blair
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. Colledge
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. G. V. Mitchell
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Cognitive NeuroscienceUniversity College LondonLondonEngland
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity College LondonLondonEngland

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