Advertisement

Biodegradation

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 23–29 | Cite as

Aerobic biotransformation of 4-fluorocinnamic acid to 4-fluorobenzoic acid

  • Luisa M. Freitas dos Santos
  • Arnaud Spicq
  • Anthony P. New
  • Giuseppe Lo Biundo
  • Jean-Claude Wolff
  • Andrew Edwards
Article

Abstract

The biotransformation of 4-fluorocinnamic acid (FCA) using non-acclimated industrial activated sludge was investigated. FCA is a common intermediate in organic synthesis, and it is often present in aqueous waste streams. Hence, the biotransformation reactions this compound undergoes when exposed to activated sludge micro-organisms should be understood before waste streams are sent to biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). FCA biotransformation was monitored using a wide range of analytical techniques. These techniques were used to monitor not only FCA disappearance, but also the formation of degradation products, in order to propose the metabolic pathway. FCA was biotransformed to 4-fluorobenzoic acid via the formation of 4-fluoroacetophenone. The removal of FCA up to 200 mg L-1 followed first order kinetics. The half-lives for removal of FCA from the test solutions supplied with 200 mg L-1, 100 mg L-1, and 50 mg L-1 were 53, 18, and 5 hours respectively.

4-fluorobenzoic acid 4-fluorocinnamic acid biotransformation monitoring techniques non-acclimated activated sludge 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Fewson C,Kennedy S &Livingstone A (1968) Metabolism of monofluorobenzoates by bacterium NCIB 8250. J. Biochem. 109(2): 6P-7PGoogle Scholar
  2. Haeggblom M,Rivera M &Young L (1996) Anaerobic degradation of halogenated benzoic acids coupled to denitrification observed in variety of sediment and soil samples. FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 144(2–3): 213–219PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Harper D &Blakley R (1971) Metabolism of p-fluorobenzoic acid by a Pseudomonas species. Can. J. Microbiol. 17(8): 1015–1023PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Horvath R &Flathman P (1976) Co-metabolism of fluorobenzoates by natural microbial populations. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 31(6): 889–891PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Kobayashi K,Katayama-Hirayama K &Tobita S (1997) Hydrolytic dehalogenation of 4-chlorobenzoic acid by an Acinetobacter sp. J. Gen. AppI. Microbiol. 43(2): 105–108Google Scholar
  6. Oltmanns R,Mueller R,Otto M &Lingens F (1989) Evidence for a new pathway in the bacterial degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55(10): 2499–2504PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Ramanand K,Balba M &Duffy J (1995) Biodegradation of select organic pollutants in soil columns under denitrifying conditions. Hazard. Waste Hazard. Mater. 12(1): 27–36Google Scholar
  8. Ruzzi M,Montebove P &Sciesser Ponente A (1997) Effect of the carbon source on the utilisation of ferulic m-and p-coumaric acids by a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain. Ann. Microbiol. Enzymology 47(1): 87–96Google Scholar
  9. van den Tweel W,KoK JB &de Bont JM (1987) Reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorobenzoate to 4-chlorobenzoate and hydrolytic dehalogenation of 4-chloro, 4-bromo, and 4-iodobenzoate by Alcaligenes denitrificans NTB-1. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53(4): 810–815PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luisa M. Freitas dos Santos
    • 1
  • Arnaud Spicq
    • 1
  • Anthony P. New
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Lo Biundo
    • 1
  • Jean-Claude Wolff
    • 1
  • Andrew Edwards
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Research Laboratory, Analytical SciencesSmithKline Beecham PharmaceuticalsHarlowUK

Personalised recommendations