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Educational Psychology Review

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 353–383 | Cite as

Personal Epistemology Research: Implications for Learning and Teaching

  • Barbara K. Hofer
Article

Abstract

The ideas that individuals hold about knowledge and knowing have been the target of research programs with disparate names, such as epistemological beliefs, reflective judgment, ways of knowing, and epistemological reflection, all of which appear to be a part of a larger body of work on “personal epistemology.” Epistemological perspectives are salient in numerous academic experiences, have been shown to be related to learning in various ways, influence reasoning and judgment throughout our lives, and have implications for teaching. Yet this work has remained outside the mainstream of educational psychology and cognitive development. This paper addresses three main questions: (1) What is personal epistemology research and how is it conceptualized? (2) How are individuals' conceptions of epistemology related to learning and instruction? (3) Given what we know about personal epistemology, what might educators do? Suggestions are also provided for future research and theoretical development.

personal epistemology epistemological beliefs epistemological development epistemic cognition cognitive development 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara K. Hofer
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentMiddlebury College

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