Chromosome Research

, Volume 9, Issue 6, pp 431–435 | Cite as

Species-specific evolution of repeated DNA sequences in great apes

  • R. Toder
  • F. Grützner
  • T. Haaf
  • E. Bausch

Abstract

DNA sequencing reveals that the genomes of the human, gorilla and chimpanzee share more than 98% homology. Comparative chromosome painting and gene mapping have demonstrated that only a few rearrangements of a putative ancestral mammalian genome occurred during great ape and human evolution. However, interspecies representational difference analysis (RDA) of the gorilla between human and gorilla revealed gorilla-specific DNA sequences. Cloning and sequencing of gorilla-specific DNA sequences indicate that there are repetitive elements. Gorilla-specific DNA sequences were mapped by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to the subcentromeric/centromeric regions of three pairs of gorilla submetacentric chromosomes. These sequences could represent either ancient sequences that got lost in other species, such as human and orang-utan, or, more likely, recent sequences which evolved or originated specifically in the gorilla genome.

genome evolution species-specific DNA sequences 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Toder
    • 1
  • F. Grützner
    • 3
  • T. Haaf
    • 3
  • E. Bausch
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Human Genetics and AnthropologyUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.Currently at GeneScan Europe AGFreiburgGermany
  3. 3.Max Planck Institute for Molecular GeneticsBerlinGermany

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