Molecular Breeding

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 275–291

The candidate gene approach in plant genetics: a review

  • Stéphanie Pflieger
  • Véronique Lefebvre
  • Mathilde Causse
Article

DOI: 10.1023/A:1011605013259

Cite this article as:
Pflieger, S., Lefebvre, V. & Causse, M. Molecular Breeding (2001) 7: 275. doi:10.1023/A:1011605013259

Abstract

The candidate gene (CG) approach has been applied in plant genetics in the past decade for the characterisation and cloning of Mendelian and quantitative trait loci (QTLs). It constitutes a complementary strategy to map-based cloning and insertional mutagenesis. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of CG analyses in plant genetics. CG analysis is based on the hypothesis that known-function genes (the candidate genes) could correspond to loci controlling traits of interest. CGs refer either to cloned genes presumed to affect a given trait (`functional CGs') or to genes suggested by their close proximity on linkage maps to loci controlling the trait (`positional CGs'). In plant genetics, the most common way to identify a CG is to look for map co-segregation between CGs and loci affecting the trait. Statistical association analyses between molecular polymorphisms of the CG and variation in the trait of interest have also been carried out in a few studies. The final validation of a CG will be provided through physiological analyses, genetic transformation and/or sexual complementation. Theoretical and practical applications of validated CGs in plant genetics and breeding are discussed.

Candidate gene Gene cloning Gene mapping Mendelian trait locus Quantitative trait locus 

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stéphanie Pflieger
    • 1
  • Véronique Lefebvre
    • 1
  • Mathilde Causse
    • 1
  1. 1.Unité de Génétique et d'Amélioration des Fruits et LégumesInstitut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA)Montfavet cedexFrance

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