GeoInformatica

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 291–315 | Cite as

Towards a Methodology for the Evaluation of Multimedia Geographical Information Products

  • William E. Cartwright
  • Gary J. Hunter
Article

Abstract

The design and production of multimedia and interactive maps could seem to have more in common with video and film production than digital map production and software development. The processes employed apply different methodologies to map making and the talents and skills of the personnel involved are different, diverse and, in many cases, unlike those needed for conventional mapping. The evaluation of multimedia geographical information products could be undertaken using a different manner than that employed for evaluating conventional. This paper discusses the unique evaluation requirements for multimedia mapping and GIS products which include multimedia. It then outlines how the methods used to evaluate multimedia publications might be used as a model for developing an evaluation procedure unique to this type of contemporary mapping commodity.

multimedia evaluation 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • William E. Cartwright
    • 1
  • Gary J. Hunter
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Land InformationRMIT University, GPO Box 2476 VMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Geomatics, and Center for GIS and ModellingThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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