Journal of Insect Conservation

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 77–85 | Cite as

The Biodiversity and Conservation of Saproxylic Diptera In Scotland

  • Graham E. Rotheray
  • Geoff Hancock
  • Steve Hewitt
  • David Horsfield
  • Iain MacGowan
  • David Robertson
  • Kenneth Watt
Article

Abstract

Over a ten year period, 1988–1998, over 300 woodlands were visited throughout Scotland and 2061 records of saproxylic Diptera obtained. Of these 1574 were records of early stages; 258 species in 32 families were encountered; 206 species were reared of which 53 were red-listed, 9 were new to Britain and 10 were new to science. Most records came from native boreal trees such as Betula pubescens, Pinus sylvestris and Populus tremula. However, few saproxylic Diptera were specific to tree species, exceptions were 6 red-listed species associated with P. tremula and 5 red-listed species with P. sylvestris. In contrast, most saproxylic Diptera were specific to microhabitat or breeding site. The most important microhabitats were decaying sap under bark and decaying sapwood. Most red-listed species are restricted to Strathspey and north-east Scotland where relatively large stands of native boreal trees exist.

microhabitat breeding site larva rearing specificity 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham E. Rotheray
    • 1
  • Geoff Hancock
    • 1
  • Steve Hewitt
    • 1
  • David Horsfield
    • 1
  • Iain MacGowan
    • 1
  • David Robertson
    • 1
  • Kenneth Watt
    • 1
  1. 1.National Museums of ScotlandEdinburghUK

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